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TE Induction

Routines and Procedures: Using Materials and Timers Effectively


Today during our Induction Routines and Procedures: Materials and Timers session, teachers learned how to plan and execute a system that includes distributing materials efficiently and effectively. As a teacher you can use a variety of timers including power-point timers, stop watches, verbal countdowns, and visual countdowns using your hands. Utilizing these timers for classroom routines and procedures creates a sense of urgency, maximizes instructional time and builds a culture of achievement with your students. AWESOME!

Induction learning does not at the end of sessionsJ As an extension of the Routines & Procedures: Materials and Timers session, we like for you to access the following video link-
https://vimeo.com/45315232
Then use your skills checklist to evaluate the video. This video is of a current teacher so please be respectful in your critiques.  Otherwise, think critically and carefully about the timers, materials, and methods of his classroom and how they could be integrated into your classroom.  Lastly, we want to hear your responses to the questions below. Please leave your comments on this post. Let’s reflect and interact together.  

Questions:
1. Which aspects of our checklist is the teacher using?
2. Which aspects are absent in the video?
3. Specifically identify 1-2 things you would do differently? Explain.

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Discussion

86 thoughts on “Routines and Procedures: Using Materials and Timers Effectively

  1. 1. and 2. Using our Materials and Timers Checklist I observed the following:
    – He used verbal countdowns, chunking of directions, and lots of great praise for students.
    – He did not use a visual timer, student jobs, a track of progress or have to complete the activity multiple times.

    3. Now that we have our nifty timers, I would use my visual timer on my overhead projector. Also, I would give the students more direction on how they are to accomplish the task. I think that having a CFU would have been helpful for the students.

    *As a side note: I love the idea of team teaching. This is a great way to boost first year teachers confidence, along with helping to hold each other accountable. BRILLIANT! 🙂

    Posted by Jessica Todd | July 13, 2012, 5:35 pm
  2. 1. Which aspects of our checklist is the teacher using?
    They used plenty of list actions materials and time frames. Also verbal timing devices where used (countdowns). The directions were chunked quite a few times.
    2. Which aspects are completely absent in the video?
    I didn’t hear enough Praise in the video
    3. What would you do differently? (Be Specific)
    I would have stopped a few times just to make sure that the kids who weren’t paying attention got back on track. As well as redirect some of the students who weren’t paying attention (at times). Would have given out some Praise to students who were following directions , so other students can follow along.

    Posted by Jeffery Oribhabor | July 13, 2012, 5:44 pm
  3. Both teachers used verbal timing devices, countdowns of various lengths. They both also gave incremental warnings for longer countdowns, i.e. 20 seconds and 10 seconds for a 30 second activity, which I think is appropriate at all grade levels, and especially for middle school and younger grades to maintain their focus on the task. I would classify this as a form of tracking progress, or monitoring progress. The activity was clearly pre-planned down to the level of seconds, and a healthy amount of positive behavior narration.

    I did not observe any visual timing device. For the 30 second activity, a physical timer or an online timer may have been effective, and may have even served as a scaffold from total teacher monitoring (with the incremental warnings) to student self-monitoring. Either way, students feel a sense of urgency, but I know that I get distracted and frustrated when a teacher or instructor gives me directions for a task and then continues to talk while we work.

    Posted by Jonathan | July 13, 2012, 5:47 pm
  4. I think the teacher did a good job of pre-planning his activity–he mentioned working on it since Wednesday. He clearly had outline with his co-teacher how she would support him while he was setting up the activity. He also did verbal countdowns and gave out times. He chunked his directions, had the kids go from ending last activity, grading the next, preparing for the next and set up. He also occasionally did verbal anonymous and specific praise of the class.

    Things that were absent from the video was redirecting non-compliant behavior while he was going over the grading exercise. He also didn’t have a visual timer or anything to hold himself or the students accountable to the time frames that he gave out. There was one moment when he said the students had 30 seconds but he didn’t have anyway for them to check how quickly time was moving or anything for him to check. His co-teacher did start to do a verbal count down at 20 seconds.

    2 Things that I would do differently: I would have had the students take out their grade tracker before we started grading so that they could record their grade and not be off task trying to sneak and put it in while he’s transitioning to the next activity. If there is an explicit place for them to put their grades I think they’ll want to do that rather than put in on the scratch paper. I would also have done a check for understanding when doing the grading to make sure the students understood why the answers that I gave were correct and that they understood the reason that I solved the way that I had.

    Posted by Jocelyn Thomas | July 13, 2012, 5:52 pm
  5. 1. It’s clear that the lesson plan had been rehearsed. The wording of instructions was clear. There are numerous instances of timing (counting down, providing time limits) to make expectations clear and allow the class to move along at an appropriate place. Personal, public reinforcement during the group work as well as personal and non verbal redirectives kept the class on task throughout. Chunking the directions by giving a task, allowing time to complete and then repeating with a new task was really helpful. A variety of different AGTs also kept things fresh.
    2. There are no visual timers for students to assess how much time they have left to complete a task. It seems that with 30 seconds, yelling out how much time is left every 10 seconds seems a bit distracting given that there is so little time in the first place.
    3. When explaining the “Kit-Kat Kapacity” task, I would have broken off a piece of that set of instructions by leaving off the beginning disclaimer about good behavior leading to future tasks. I do realize the value of this, but in my mind focused, efficient work is an expectation and doesn’t need to be served up with an ultimatum. Once the students had set out on the task, I would have roamed around, provided some reinforcement and assisted students as necessary.

    Posted by Ted P | July 13, 2012, 5:54 pm
  6. 1. Chunked directions, positive narration as students completed the task, gave clear directives
    2. While he gave a time frame, he missed an opportunity to review how efficient they were in completing the task (track progress)
    3. I agree with Jessica and would have had a check for understanding of steps before beginning the activity.

    Posted by Courtney Robinson | July 13, 2012, 6:05 pm
  7. This teacher did a really good job at offering students explicit instructions in small increments that they were able to perform without confusion. He was also very good at instilling a sense of urgency through verbal timing (countdowns, etc).

    I would have liked to see him offer specific positive reinforcement more frequently. He redirected a few students, but there seemed to be very little whole class praise (with the exception of his belief that the students would be up to the challenge the activity presented).

    I would have had a timer projected somewhere on the board (both for myself and the students) and would have pushed myself to offer more reinforcement of students meeting expectations before redirecting students who were less focused.

    Posted by KatieDonovan | July 13, 2012, 6:18 pm
  8. 1. The first noticeable thing is the amount of time that this teacher took in planning a creative lesson. The preparation is apparent in the design of the box and the instructions. He made sure that it would be visually stimulating to students as well as have things involved that interested them, like candy. There was a lot of use of countdowns for students to know how much time they had to complete tasks as well. The directions were fairly chunked and he used pauses to give himself breaks. There was also praise in what he believed the students would be able to do.

    2. Because he gave a lot of timed activities he could have implemented the use of a visual time tracker on the overhead for students at some point. And although he took breaks in giving directions I think that a couple of CFUs could have been used to make sure that students were still following him. There was a lot of words and no stopping to have students repeat instruction.

    3. I would have utilized a timer that the students could see for the work that they broke into groups to do when estimating the kit kat quantities. I think a visual would have been helpful and would have provided a little visual stimulation after all of that listening. With the use of a countdown timer I would be able to walk around and hear some of the group guesses instead of focusing on the countdown, which would help in my assessment of student understanding. I would have also written some of the key expectations or goals of the assignment on the board as I talked in case students forgot something that I’d explained in my directions.

    Posted by Lauren Bailey | July 13, 2012, 6:25 pm
  9. 1. This student demonstrated several of the skills we discussed today. Some examples were his use of time limits and verbal countdowns, chunking instructions, and occasional verbal praise of students. Moreover, his instructions were clear and explicit.

    2. However, while he did establish time limits he lacked a visual timer, which seemed particularly problematic when he gave the students a 30 second time limit but seemed to just guesstimate when time ticked down. The teacher also failed to check for understanding of the group activity he had explained.

    3. While I found his classroom procedures well planned and his activity creative, I would have a made a couple of adjustments to this lesson plan. First, I would have provided a timer to help students with time management. Second, I would have checked for understanding before launching into activity

    Posted by Louise Burgher | July 13, 2012, 6:30 pm
  10. This teacher has clearly planned the lesson very well and thought a lot about the kind of classroom culture he wants to have, he gives a clear list of expectations that the students are familiar with, and he is aware of the materials his lesson will require. In addition, he gives time limits and counts down on several occasions, but does not do so with a visual component.
    Finally, while there is little or no direct praise, there is evidence of some positive framing. Ultimately, then, I would include more specific chunking of information by dividing up the class with specific timing and visual representations of the urgency with which students will be learning.

    Posted by Katie Stucko | July 13, 2012, 6:31 pm
  11. Both teachers are using verbal countdowns. I especially liked how, at one point, the girl said that the students have five seconds to make a decision and five seconds to write their answer, showing them how much time should be devoted to each task. I also liked how the teachers chunked directions by switching speakers. Both teachers pointed out behavior that met expectations.

    Student may have benefited from a visual timer when there were larger portions of time given to them. I don’t know how much the teacher extends the lesson, but I feel like he could have explained how to estimate how many Kit-Kat bars could fit in the box.

    Based on what we learned today, I might add a visual timer, and maybe even chunk the directions a little more. I would also probably add more student interaction so that there would be more opportunity for verbal praise.

    Posted by Andie | July 13, 2012, 6:41 pm
  12. 1. The teacher used verbal timing when time was a smaller amount. He also did a good job at chunking his instructions to where it wouldn’t be too much for his students to remember the activity. I didn’t notice any behavior or procedural problems with students; everyone seemed to be on task and engaged so there was no need to do anything over again. I am also going to assume that there was pre-planning exercise. He was very clear and specific with his expectations and directions for the activity which leads me to think he took the time to previously do it himself. Even though a student wasn’t the one passing out the notes, there was a clear system in place where materials were distributed by the team teacher.

    2.& 3. The teacher never used a visual timer and I didn’t hear any praise throughout the video. The teacher did a great job! I would have used a visual timer when the time limit was a larger number, like 30 seconds. This will allow students to be able to see how much time is left and also help teachers stay true to the time limit they have set. We can sometimes estimate the time and it can end up running over or under. I would have also given more praise to groups that seemed to be working together very well or having great discussions.

    Posted by Cintia Arenas | July 13, 2012, 7:20 pm
  13. I enjoyed the energy that this Teacher carried throughout the lesson. He is motivated to be teaching and it is reflected in the interactions that he has with the students. He works well with the co-teacher and is highly capable in teaching abstract concepts to the students.

    I think that from the checklist, the teacher is able to demonstrate that he has planned sufficiently for his students and knows how to help the students gain an understanding of the concepts. I think that the two teachers have practiced or at least discussed the different roles that they would assume while they were delivering the content. The teacher used many verbal timed strategies to keep the students on task and worked really well getting the students to understand his goals and high expectations for them.

    I think that there could have been more timer in the classwork. He must have been present on the day that everyone received free timers. I also think that there were times he could have delivered more praise to the students and or redirect students who were not completely focused on the goals at hand.

    Overall, I believe that the teacher gave an excellent and effective lesson. At a few points I felt his body language could have been improved by making his movements more purposeful. This was a good learning experience for me and I think that all can take messages from what he did well and in the things that he could improve.

    Posted by Kason Twitchell | July 13, 2012, 7:26 pm
  14. From the very beginning it was clear that the lesson was pre planned and that he knew what he was teaching as well as his expectations of his students and his expected outcome at the end of class. He was very direct in the information that he gave to the class. To aid in understand, he used a model as well as a powerpoint to teach from so that he could reach as many different learning styles as possible.

    I love his use of a countdown to return attention to his instruction but I think a visual timer/timekeeper would have been a fun addition to the lesson. Overall I feel like he did a great job having expected materials for all students. He also did a fantastic job using countdowns/timing to keep both himself and his students on track. Academically I would have walked around a bit more while students were in groups to understand where each group was going with their Kit-Kat responses.

    Posted by Jamie Birchett | July 13, 2012, 7:37 pm
  15. I want to point out that the male teacher did a great job planning his lesson overall. I thought the hexagonal prism and Kit-Kat bars were a great way to visual the concept. Morover, he anticipated the responses of the students and made sure to teach explicitly his academic and behaviorally explanations for how he wanted the class to respond to the material stimuli. As well, I thought he did a good job of being aware of the student’s materials in the beginning. He noted that they could use their grade tracker, now or at later time (being specific about when), and scrap paper for jotting down thoughts. He countdowned (verbal timing) with the clear expectation for students to have their red pen. His grading procedure for the do-first was spot-on. It demonstrated well the concept of teaching explictly – he chunked with specific and clear instructions and expectations.

    While he didn’t track progress, it would not have been appropriate to do so anyway. He could have used more visuals to support his timing.

    Questions:
    1. Which aspects of our checklist is the teacher using?

    He is using pre-planning, verbal timing, and praise.

    2. Which aspects are absent in the video?

    Track progress, visual timing, do it right and do it again (but it was not necessary)

    3. Specifically identify 1-2 things you would do differently? Explain

    Firslty, I would have made my praise more specific as to what action was good and why, and made eye contact with the class to ensure that I had communicated my sincerity. Secondly as a part of chunking, I would have asked more questions to reassure that my instructions and directions were understood and that my students’ brains were activated.

    Posted by A.M. Roussel | July 13, 2012, 7:38 pm
  16. Based on the information we discussed today, it is clear that the teacher planned and rehearsed this lesson, multiple times prior to presenting it to his students. Clear expectations were given by both the teacher and the co-teacher, and it seemed that students were fully invested in the lesson. Directions for how to successfully participate in this activity were chunked, which helped to set students up for success. Lastly, at transition points, both teachers did a good job of counting down and making sure students were aware of their time limitations for that portion of the activity.

    While countdowns were used, at no point did I observe a visual timer, like the ones that we received today, or even an on-line timer resource tool. In terms of things that could have been done differently, I think the use of the visual timer would have definitely enhanced the lesson. Also, incorporating opportunities for the students to ask questions (CFU), or to turn and talk with their peers would have also ensured that students had a full understanding of the content.

    Posted by Matthew Carothers Jr | July 13, 2012, 7:53 pm
  17. The teacher did a good job with being aware of the student’s materials and using them. For example, he pointed out that the students could their scrap paper and data tracker. He counted down verbally, but he could have reinforced his point with visual timing. He clearly did some solid pre-planning as he anticipated student’s responses to the material stimuli of the hexagonal prism and Kit-Kat boxes. He taught explicitly using chunking very well during section introducing the box. Also, he did a great job of getting students back to attention after group work through three sets of claps.

    There were areas to grow in this video. He told have chunked (breaking down directions) even further and used more pauses to get anyone’s full attention. I would have made my praise more specific (what the good action and why is it good) and had more eye contact during praise to ensure that I was communicating my sincerity. Plus, I would have asked more questions about the directives to make sure that my students were engaged.

    Posted by A.M. Roussel | July 13, 2012, 7:56 pm
  18. The teacher did a good job with being aware of the student’s materials and using them. For example, he pointed out that the students could their scrap paper and data tracker. He counted down verbally, but he could have reinforced his point with visual timing. He clearly did some solid pre-planning as he anticipated student’s responses to the material stimuli of the hexagonal prism and Kit-Kat boxes. He taught explicitly using chunking very well during section introducing the box. He did a great job of getting students back to attention after group work through three sets of claps.

    There were areas to grow in this video. He told have chunked (breaking down directions) even further and used more pauses to get anyone’s full attention. I would have made my praise more specific (what the good action and why is it good) and had more eye contact during praise to ensure that I was communicating my sincerity. Plus, I would have asked more questions about the directives to make sure that my students were engaged.

    Posted by A.M. Roussel | July 13, 2012, 7:56 pm
  19. This teacher had the lesson clearly planned out for execution. It was accurately explained as well as the teacher having the abillity to relate clear expectations to students. I also liked the fact that he as well as the other teacher echoed each other to solidify student understanding (CFU).

    Through the directives, he did give time limit for activities to be completed but he did give a Instead of using a visual timer, t a verbal countdown was utilized. In essence, this could have been effective to expedite each group’s decision making process, but the countdown could have been inaccurate. Also, their was no praise for the task being completed in the desired time limit.

    The teacher had an amazing idea for an activity and the directives were direct. The only issue was the follow-through. I believe the students should have received praise after completing the task by each countdown. It is important that they know reaching a goal is appreciated. Also, utlizing a visual timer for viewing purposes to ensure time accuracy.

    Posted by Kristal | July 13, 2012, 8:06 pm
  20. This teacher had the lesson clearly planned out for execution. It was accurately explained as well as the teacher having the abillity to relate clear expectations to students. I also liked the fact that he as well as the other teacher echoed each other to solidify student understanding (CFU).

    Through the directives, he did give time limit for activities to be completed but he did give a Instead of using a visual timer, t a verbal countdown was utilized. In essence, this could have been effective to expedite each group’s decision making process, but the countdown could have been inaccurate. Also, their was no praise for the task being completed in the desired time limit.

    The teacher had an amazing idea for an activity and the directives were direct. The only issue was the follow-through. I believe the students should have received praise after completing the task by each countdown. It is important that they know reaching a goal is appreciated. Also, utlizing a visual timer for viewing purposes to ensure time accuracy

    Posted by Kristal | July 13, 2012, 8:07 pm
  21. 1. Which aspects of our checklist is the teacher using?
    The teacher did an excellent job of pre-planning his activities for the day. Multiple times during the lecture he used countdowns to make sure the students finished their given tasks. He also gave very clear directions and expectations of the students. The female teacher made it a point of praising many of the students while they were writing

    2. Which aspects are absent in the video?
    The teacher did not seem to check for any understandings of what was expected of them after giving them a lengthy explination of the lesson.

    3. Specifically identify 1-2 things you would do differently? Explain.
    I feel that his tone could have been a little more up-beat and positive/his body language and movements could of had more purpose. One thing I would have changed to to physically put the timers that are more than 15 seconds on the projector or somewhere for the students to see.

    Posted by Courtney Andree | July 13, 2012, 8:10 pm
  22. He had really good tone throughout, making it clear to the students what he wanted through chunk direction and clear language. As well, it is obvious that he planned the lesson thoroughly and effectively to get through everything in the best way possible.
    One thing that could be improved and many people have already commented on is his lack of a visual timer. Just for the sake of consistency, students should be aware of how much time has lapsed and how much is left.
    Overall it was very good. If it was my lesson, I would have used a bit more encouragement and praise throughout but that’s also just my style as well and it suits me.

    Posted by Mark Fritzenschaft | July 13, 2012, 8:11 pm
  23. 1. He clearly pre-planned the lesson to great detail. I could tell that he put a lot of time into scripting what he would say and that really helped him engage his students in the lesson. He used several different verbal timing strategies to bring the class back together after an activity. I like how his expectations were clear as far as making sure the students knew how high of a standard he held them to. Lastly, the directions were chunked in a very effective way.

    2. I did not see much praise in this video. His helper praised some of the students while they were writing down their predictions, but that was the only sign of it. Also, even though it seemed like the students understood the instructions it might have helped for him to check for understanding periodically.

    3. Two things I would have done differently would be to give more praise to the students as they worked and have a visual timer or one that makes a noise when time is out so the time is more accurate.

    Posted by Shannon Funke | July 13, 2012, 8:12 pm
  24. He was very thorough in his lesson plans. I could tell that he spent a lot of time preparing for his lesson. He was not nervous but was very calm and comfortable up there. He used the countdown method often. He was engaging and enthusiastic. He stated clear expectations and guidelines. He explained the answer to the Do-First in great detail and showed them the correct method they could have used to solve the problem. He used redirection anonymously when necessary , clear directives, and his tone was direct. The students were not confused nor did they hesitate about what their next step was. He used the clapping method to get their attention. His students were attentive and well-behaved. I think an area for him to grow is to encourage his students more. I think a visual timer would have been a good addition to his lecture. Something I would have done differently is encouraged the students more and made it more interactive. It was really neat to hear him state his expectations to the student stating his belief in their ability. He was creative and innovative.

    Posted by Brie Olootu | July 13, 2012, 8:35 pm
  25. The teachers effectively use several aspects of our checklist including: verbal timers, the chunking of directions, public reinforcement, as well as public redirection.

    The biggest absence I noted in the video was a lack of a visual timer. However, he did do a nice job of verbally counting down the last few seconds of each section.

    Overall, I would not have performed the lesson much differently. Their tones were calm and formal, and you could tell they both were comfortable and had control of their class. In addition to everything they did, I would also have paused to check understanding of the directions, as well as provided a visual timer to aid the students.

    Posted by William Cloud | July 13, 2012, 8:40 pm
  26. 1. Which aspects of our checklist is the teacher using?
    The teacher in this video was very efficient (used his time wisely) and well rehearsed during the lesson. His use of verbal timing and specific and directions really allowed the students to understand exactly what was expected of them. He also delivered the directions using the chunking method, which helped clarify the rules for the group activity.

    2. Which aspects are absent in the video?
    I didn’t see much positive reinforcement or interaction with the students. For a 7 minute clip, I expected to see his students a bit more engaged in the lesson rather than a one sided lecture.

    3. Specifically identify 1-2 things you would do differently? Explain.
    I thought that having another teacher in the classroom may have been distracting for the students as she served as another figure to track, pay attention to, and process more information. I think that one instructor for the students to listen to is much more effective than 2 or more.

    Posted by Shawn-tae Greene | July 13, 2012, 8:43 pm
  27. 1. Which aspects of our checklist is the teacher using?
    The teacher did a good job with being aware of the student’s materials and using them. For example, he pointed out that the students could their scrap paper and data tracker. He counted down verbally, He clearly did some solid pre-planning as he anticipated student’s responses to the material stimuli of the hexagonal prism and Kit-Kat boxes. He taught explicitly using chunking very well during section introducing the box. He did a great job of getting students back to attention after group work through three sets of claps.

    2. Which aspects are absent in the video?
    He could have reinforced his point with visual timing.

    3. Specifically identify 1-2 things you would do differently? Explain.
    There were areas to grow in this video. He told have chunked (breaking down directions) even further and used more pauses to get anyone’s full attention. I would have made my praise more specific (what the good action and why is it good) and had more eye contact during praise to ensure that I was communicating my sincerity. Plus, I would have asked more questions about the directives to make sure that my students were engaged.

    Posted by A.M. Roussel | July 13, 2012, 8:47 pm
  28. 1. Like others have mentioned, it seems like he really sat down to think about, prepare, and rehearse his lesson. He was on point in his delivery, and everything was organized and ready right in front of him.

    2. Aside from not having a timer, there should be more praise. The teacher is giving a lot of directives, and generally the students are doing a great job of following and paying attention. Honoring that behavior is an important factor in keeping them engaged.

    3. Like Ted, I would not have given the students an ultimatum about good behavior and activities. I think that “assuming the best” and the “Do it again, and do it right!” principles are more effective in this aspect. Instead of warning students about the possibilities of failure, I would assume that they will succeed until they start to fall under expectations. At that point, redirection is necessary.

    Posted by Liz Sieng | July 13, 2012, 8:56 pm
  29. The teacher does a great job of maintaining a calm and neutral tone throughout his instruction. He uses speaking pauses tactfully and does a effective job of mixing his reinforcement with his redirection. By consciously choosing when the best time is to deliver either reinforcement or redirection, he maximizes the effectiveness.

    I liked that the student teacher and the main teacher maintained a consistent way of handling the classroom, but I felt that the timer aspect of classroom management could have been introduced to the lesson sooner. The beginning of the class seemed to be a little more lax, while the end of the class seemed to use the time more efficiently.

    I felt that the teacher conducted the lesson effectively and I learned a lot from his methods of reasoning and organization, but I personally would have moved around the classroom more and used a digital timer more frequently throughout my lesson.

    Posted by Kristina Bockhold | July 13, 2012, 8:59 pm
  30. 1. Pre-Planning, Teaching Explicitly, Use of verbal timing devices (counting down)
    2. While he did not praise frequently, I didn’t find the amount of praise to be underwhelming like others did. Depending on the time of year, students could meet an expectation without the teacher having to give praise–for example, when students get quiet as the teacher counts down or respond to him by clapping once, clapping twice, etc. It could have been helpful for the teacher to use a visual timer, however, and to give small group or individual praise for exemplary behavior.
    3. I would get my students more pumped up about their activity by seeming more stoked about it, myself. I also would have used a timer when students grouped together so they could have a visual representation of how long they had until they needed to redirect their attention to me.

    Posted by Rachel Rucker | July 13, 2012, 9:08 pm
  31. The teacher that presented the lesson plan seemed very well prepared. He was confident in the material he presented to the class– he stood tall, his tone was neutral and calm. His instruction was clear and he made his expectations known… i.e. “as notes are passed out your eyes are on me.” He gave the students a time limit and used verbal countdowns throughout the lesson. He also gave an appropriate amount or chunk of instruction for the students to follow.
    One aspect that we did discuss today was the use of a visual countdown (like a timer) so that the students can see how much time is left– this was absent from this particular teacher’s lesson.
    I think one of the main things I noticed that I would add in or do differently would be to check for understanding. We have learned that it is important to ask a question to ensure that students have identified what is expected of them before moving forward. So I think it would be beneficial to incorporate this into his lesson so that he knows his students are listening and processing the expectation/directions.

    Posted by Alex Wentz | July 13, 2012, 9:08 pm
  32. 1. There are numerous times throughout the lesson that the teacher used the aspect of time in order to make sure that all of his expectations were clear and that the class could move at an efficient pace. He was very diligent at chunking the directions throughout the lesson, and he did an extremely good job at redirection and reinforcement. His expectations were clear throughout the lesson, especially while he was introducing the new activity.

    2. There are no actual visual timers throughout the lesson. Although he is stating the time every so many seconds, it would be helpful for students to be able to visualize the time, and also less of a distraction while they are working.

    3. I would place a timer under the overhead so the students were constantly aware of the time restraints. I also would have moved around the classroom more to take advantage of the space.

    Posted by Mercedes Witzke | July 13, 2012, 9:29 pm
  33. First off, I think this is a really cool lesson that can get students engaged (with something they are interested in) as well as make them use critical thinking skills and math to solve a problem!

    1.) Some of the things that I noticed he did really well was the use of verbal timing (counting down, time limits, etc), chunking of directions (didn’t give more than 1 or 2 directions at a time), well planned (he had clearly thought through the materials and “how” to do it before he presented to the class), and had a calm/neutral tone throughout. His directions and tone also set clear expectations for students throughout the clip.
    2.) One thing to grow on would be to use more visual timers. This would help the students SEE how much time they had, which also gives them a sense of urgency. Also, the class seemed to be following directions well so if redirecting is not applicable, he could give more reinforcement! Praise the students for following directions and doing well!
    3.) Something I would have added to this lesson would be more checks for understanding. Stop and ASK the students about the directions or the content (especially when going over their warm-up). Even simple questions to make sure they understand their expectations– especially in a multi-step lesson like this one! Another thing that could have been added is more reinforcement and positive narration. Because we have such high expectations for our students, we should praise them when they meet them!

    Posted by Jackie Sherman | July 13, 2012, 9:35 pm
  34. ASPECTS USED The male teacher used a verbal countdown (5…1) at the beginning of the clip to reinforce the expectation that the students quickly have a red pen in hand. Similarly, the female teacher used a countdown from 10 while students made their guesses. He also employed a large amount of pre-planning beyond lesson content, sequence, and materials. It was apparent to me that he had planned explicit, specific sets of expectations and directions for the students.

    ASPECTS ABSENT It might have been present, but I didn’t notice any kind of visual tracker for student progress. I think all timing devices were verbal. Echoing others, I think the amount of praise given to the students was less than we should strive for.

    I WOULD DO DIFFERENTLY Occasionally, when the male teacher offered praise, his eyes were focused on his materials. This lack of eye contact had the effect of making the praise feel less genuine. I want to do my best to address my students directly when I praise them.

    There were times when students failed to slant, and pencils tapped. The teacher did not reinforce expectations or redirect students; rather, he continued to deliver lesson content. I would have considered using a nonverbal attention-getter such as silence to ensure I had everyone’s attention and reinforce the importance of the content.

    Posted by Joseph Rodd | July 13, 2012, 9:38 pm
  35. 1. Which aspects of our checklist is the teacher using?
    His tone is neutral and he speaks really clearly and slowly. He also emphasizes certain words, “punching” them to keep students attention. He does a good job of cuing students with time expectations “we’re going to take 30 seconds to. . . ” and he often counts down from 5 to give students a chance to get ready for whatever is next. He also proactively set up expectations when BEFORE he started the project. “If we want to do something fun like this in the future. . . ” They knew what they needed to do in order to be successful and look forward to similar activities in the future.

    2. Which aspects are absent in the video?
    Like Alex said, he is missing the visual cue for timing. I think response from the students during directions would be good too, just to make sure students understand what is expected of them.

    3. Specifically identify 1-2 things you would do differently? Explain.
    I would move around the room more if possible. He goes from the front table to the overhead and back and not much else. Even a quick sweep around the room while counting down from 5 might help keep the students in the back row engaged on an even deeper level. But really it was a pretty solid lesson and student engagement was great. I like how at ease he was while teaching yet kept up the pace and rigor of the lesson.

    Posted by Dottie | July 13, 2012, 9:38 pm
  36. I’ll be echoing the above, but…
    – The teacher did a great job of using verbal timing devices in his execution, he clearly pre-planned the activity, he taught explicitly.
    – There were no visual timers, so far as I could tell, which would have been good while the students were discussing. It seems like there weren’t many misbehaviors to deal with, so the absence of the “Do it Right! Do it Again!” skill isn’t too surprising.
    -I would’ve cut the explanation about the thoughts behind creating the box instead of doing another activity. Not only does it use up time, but it doesn’t engage the students. I’m not sure that’s something they need to be told. There was also a time when one teacher was asking for silence and eyes, and the other teacher addressed a student. Otherwise, seemed good!

    Posted by Grant S | July 13, 2012, 9:39 pm
  37. 1. He did a good job giving very explicit directives so as to avoid any confusion. He also chunked his information into manageable directions that his students could ingest and process. He used behavior management so smoothly it almost flowed right in with the lesson. For example, when he was waiting for everyone to be looking up he kept right on talking in the same tone without a hiccup and then continued on with the lesson immediately. Lastly, I noticed he used set times for these different tasks to be done.

    2. He didn’t really do any checks for understanding from the students or repeat anything he said. I think this could have left some students somewhat confused.

    3. Things I would have done differently would be to ask the students to repeat what I had said to make sure they had gotten it and if he was not going to give them an actual timer to refer to he could have given them a 5 second warning that their 30 seconds were almost up. Finally, he could have given them an idea of where he was going with the kit kat bars to put the activity in focus.

    Posted by Amanda Rupiper | July 13, 2012, 9:42 pm
  38. 1. The teacher was very proactive about directions. He was very specific about what he wanted students to do, and he made the expectations clear before starting the lesson. He provided positive reinforcement for when students were following his directions, and used countdowns during the lesson.
    2. The students were not able to see what the countdowns were.
    3. I would have asked more questions of the students rather than having the teacher do the majority of the talking. I also would have walked around the classroom so all students had a better view of the box.

    Posted by Allie | July 13, 2012, 9:43 pm
  39. 1. Which aspects of our checklist is the teacher using?
    The teacher had a great tone and his voice carried to the back of the room. He stood tall with his shoulders squared and he had great eye contact. He planned his lesson with purpose as the new material build upon the students’ prior knowledge.

    2. Which aspects are absent in the video?
    I agree with Shawn-Tae in that the teacher talk time was high and student talk time was non-existent.

    3. Specifically identify 1-2 things you would do differently? Explain.
    I would have said the objectives for the new activity before handing out the worksheets to ensure that I had the students’ full attention by minimizing distractions.

    Posted by Diana Quito | July 13, 2012, 9:51 pm
  40. 1. Both teachers use verbal timing verying well which indicates strong pre-planning. Both teachers praised stellar students and did a great job with positive reinforment and redriections.
    2. I did not idenfity visual times in the classroom or throughtout the lesson which would have been helpful for students to beable to monitor their work time on their own in attiond to the teacher doing verbal countdowns etc.
    3. I would have have “teacher timer” up on the elmo or projector so all the students can see the time counting down (or up). I also would have used a clipboard with a copy of the work the students were doing so that I could walk around the classroom and manage behavior while instructing nad while studnets were working.

    Posted by Laura Burrow | July 13, 2012, 9:55 pm
  41. 1. Which aspects of our checklist is the teacher using?
    The teacher is definitely using the countdown as a way to kept track of time. In my mind, I thought that starting from 10 would not be as efficient as starting from 5 but after seeing this video, I can see that it works. You can also notice that he prepared for the activity. He has his shape and kit-kats ready to go. He had his materials near his desk and accessible. I also like how he moved from his Do First to the lesson so quickly and effectively.

    2. Which aspects are absent in the video?
    At the beginning of the lesson I noticed that there were short periods of time where not all the students were tracking so I think the teacher can remind the students to always track. I also feel like he could check for understanding.

    3. Specifically identify 1-2 things you would do differently? Explain.
    This might seem like a small detail but I think that I would change the name of the activity. “Mission Impossible”, at least to me, sounds a little bit negative.

    Posted by Francisca Lopez | July 13, 2012, 9:57 pm
  42. 1. What aspects of our checklist is the teacher using? He used verbal countdowns. First when he started the class and then again for the activity. He also used redirected his students when they seemed to be getting off task. An example of this was when he said, “All eyes on me.” He also used different tactics like clapping and having the students follow along. I thought he had a great presence and seemed well organized. He also set high expectations and vocalized this to his students.

    2. Which aspects are absent in the video? He gave public reinforcement which I thought was very good, but I think he could have given more individual positive reinforcement. It would’ve been good if he had walked around the class a bit so that he could watch the progress the students were making.

    3. Specifically identify 1-2 things that you would do differently? I would give a little more positive reinforcement and also make sure that everyone was clear on what the instructions were. This would help eliminate any confusion in the classroom.

    Posted by Elle Miller Cavatore | July 13, 2012, 10:09 pm
  43. First, I want to give a Shout Out to that teacher for agreeing to have so many of his peers watch and critique his work.

    1. Which aspects of our checklist is the teacher using?
    Both teachers used countdowns to make the class efficient and to maximize learning time. This teacher also “chunked” his directions to help make them easier for students to remember and to comply.
    2. Which aspects are absent in the video?
    While he was getting the papers to pass out before working on the kit kat challenge, he started giving the directions with his back to the students. I think that if he squared up to the students and exercised the tone he employed in the rest of the lesson it would have been easier for students to follow him.
    3. Specifically identify 1-2 things you would do differently? Explain.
    GLOW: I loved the kit kat idea. The large visual and actual candy examples were great ways to capture student interest.
    GROW: As has been mentioned by the rest of the crew, the timers were all verbal. While this approach appeared to be effective, by having a visual timer this teacher could have used some of the work time to address specific behavior issues with students in a private way. In other words, he could have freed himself up to circulate the room or to review his notes, etc and give students a quiet environment in which to think. As we learned today, it’s important to model to the students the behavior you want from them. If they are silently working, it would be great to have a silent way of indicating time.
    I also wouldn’t have spent as much time explaining the ways he could have presented the activity and just focused on how great the kit kat example is going to be. Guided Notes aren’t something that should be considered a punishment. Rather, students should be excited that their teacher spent so much time working to make them enjoy learning! I think that the goal was strategic investment, which is definitely crucial, but I would have tried to spend less time on it.

    Posted by Lucia Leigh Laughlin | July 13, 2012, 10:12 pm
  44. 1. The teacher always spoke calmly and formally to the students. It was clear how much effort and thought went into the pre-planning of the lesson. He knew each point where students would need materials (red pen for grading) and what the project was going to involve. The two teachers together used several timing devices — telling the students they had X number of seconds or saying X behavior should be achieved in 3…2…1. Even behavior is narrated, as the teachers slowly received students’ attention following a shuffle to place materials/get materials out of backpacks.

    2. I noticed that the directions were not really chunked– students would have had to continuously process information about what they were doing that day, what they needed in front of them, etc. Checking for understanding might have helped to ensure that the lesson did not leave any students behind and that all students heard and understood what was expected of them.

    3. I would have paused a bit more between directions regarding actions (directives) — unless, of course, these students have practiced grading with their red pens 5,000 times. 🙂 For me, having a bit of a pause refocuses me on what comes next, grabs student attention, and allows students to better process what is being asked of them.

    Posted by Kate Rezabek | July 13, 2012, 10:16 pm
  45. 1. Which aspects of our checklist is the teacher using?
    It was obvious that the content teacher and co-teacher have planned the lesson together, and they were working well. The content teacher and co-teacher both used verbal count down. The content teacher used explicit directives, chunking directives, and clapping strategies to get attention.

    2. Which aspects are absent in the video?
    The aspects absent in the video were visual timer, and reinforcement of positive behavior. Also, 20 seconds were called out but not displayed in any form until 10 seconds were left. Another important aspect missing was CFUs.

    3. Specifically identify 1-2 things you would do differently? Explain.
    When students were filing their warm up, I would pause and get students’ attention before I start instructions about the next activity. I would use CFUs after every chunk of the instructions and directives to ensure that my students are listening and understanding. Without CFUs I might start the activity and find out students don’t know what to do.

    Posted by Afroze Jahan | July 13, 2012, 10:16 pm
  46. GLOWS: One thing this teacher did well….. was his use of a count down procedure during transitions. He also gave explicit instructions and set the expectations for their behavior before they began the activity. It is noticable that the teacher carefully planned his lesson. He also did a good job with praising several students at a table.
    GROWS: One thing to consider for the future….using a visual timer. There were a couple of instances where the teacher was speaking and several students were not slanting, maybe pausing for a second to ensure all eyes are tracking the teacher.
    3. I would use my TIMER I received today and I would chucnk more of the directions and check for understanding.
    Overall, it’s clear this teacher was excited for his lesson and put great time and thought into how he could best teach his kids!

    Posted by Kim Nunez | July 13, 2012, 10:24 pm
  47. I first want to give the teachers 2 claps on 2, 1. . 2 . .CLAP,CLAP! for letting us use their video to critique.

    1. Which aspects of our checklist is the teacher using?

    Clearly both are using the verbal timing during their lessons. The male teacher also chunked his directions to make it easier for the students to remember.

    2. Which aspects are absent in the video?

    I rarely saw any positive reinforcement from the male teacher or a visual timer, it was al verbal.

    3. Specifically identify 1-2 things you would do differently? Explain.
    1. I would use more positive reinforcement (praise) throughout the lesson.
    2. I would have used a visual timer so that the student could have a sence of how much time is left for each activity.

    Posted by Brian Chavez | July 13, 2012, 10:37 pm
  48. Glows: The teacher was great in going through the directions slowly and was able to keep the class quiet while also having assertive body language.
    Grows: I would encourage him to use a timer to make sure the students track themselves as well as giving more eye contact to the children. When he started teaching it was hard for me to be capture. He should try to show more of the excitement I’m sure he has for his subject.

    I would have given more eye contact to the children and used my area to walk around in order to make all students feel like I’m giving all of them my attention.

    Posted by Ruth Resendiz | July 13, 2012, 10:45 pm
  49. Lots of really interesting stuff happening in this video. I find these types of videos very helpful.

    He definitely used chunking and counting pretty effectively at times. I thought he was reasonably explicit in relating what the students should be doing, and he did give a little praise. He had thought things out in regards to the big activity for the day. He had clearly thought out this exercise beforehand.

    He could have definitely tracked their progress with some more praise (a class can always use more praise), and I think there was a little confusion with writing down grades, which might have been cleared up beforehand. A visual timer was also missing.

    Here’s what I would consider changing. I think I would have reinforced good behavior on the part of those who were paying attention, and I would consider using a nonverbal redirect when the students meandered (the pencil tapping kind of got to me). I think I might have included a few checks for understanding as I went along explaining my box and the candy. Might have had a few questions like, “So how do we think we can get to a good estimate here?” or, “How do you think we can come up with a good number?” or something like that. I think I might have also reconsidered my presence at the front of the classroom. At times, he was facing away or moving around, and now that I watch it, it didn’t convey a tone of assertive authority to me.

    On the whole, the lesson was really creative, though. Good stuff.

    Posted by Brian Mothersole | July 13, 2012, 10:45 pm
  50. GLOWS: The way the teacher counted down was excellent! The students also clearly knew his expectations which is aweseome. I think this teacher was amazing at setting goals for his students! His tone and posture were really great; I thought that he had a great sense of assertive authority.

    GROWS: I think a visual timer would have been fantastic. This teacher was super enthusiastic but a visual would have really helped.

    Posted by Stephanie Mills | July 13, 2012, 10:49 pm
  51. This post seems quite repetitive after all the ones that came before me, however the answers are below.

    1. The teacher did use verbal countdowns and chunked the instruction, there was never too much at once.
    2. `The teacher did not have a visual timer which would have been helpful; he also didn’t seem to track progress much.
    3. Something I would do that he didn’t do was correct any students that were not tracking him when explaining instruction. I saw there were students waving at each other and whispering and being distracted and I would correct that behavior immediately.

    Posted by Jessica E. | July 13, 2012, 10:50 pm
  52. 1.) The teachers did a good job with verbal countdowns, chunking directions, distributing materials, and had clearly done a great job of pre-planning the activity.

    2.) The teachers could have utilized a visual time device and given more praise. In general, the students could have been more involved in the process of establishing expectations (making sure the students understood and processed the expectations).

    3.) If I had done this lesson, I would have used a visual timer and would have had the students be more engaged from the beginning- it is such a cool and fun activity that I would want them to be really excited about it! A visual timer would create a sense of urgency and therefore increase the stakes. Secondly, students being more involved while establishing expectations would make the students more connected and invested in guessing and discovering the outcome.

    Posted by Dory Blackey | July 13, 2012, 11:05 pm
  53. 1. Which aspects of our checklist is the teacher using?
    The teacher did an excellent job of using verbal timing devices to keep the students on track, giving specific instructions for each transition, and praising the students that were following directions.
    2. Which aspects are absent in the video?
    Though this likely occurred, it is impossible to tell if the teacher practiced the procedure beforehand or if the teacher utilized some method to track the students progress.
    3. Specifically identify 1-2 things you would do differently? Explain.
    I may have given specific instructions for one student per table to be responsible for passing out the papers to the rest of the students at their table.

    The teacher also showed he had high expectations for his students and assumed the best by consistently reinforcing his confidence in their ability to achieve academically and behaviorally.

    Posted by Sarah Medina | July 13, 2012, 11:09 pm
  54. A verbal countdown as a tool for effective transition between activities is a great new resource for me, whereas verbal/non-verbal cues are more familiar. His planning was obviously stellar and it’s becoming more and more apparent to me that in a logistical sense, a high-achieving classroom is definitively rooted in the organizational and planning skills of the instructor, which then translates into an orderly, effective lesson plan & presentation.

    Overall, the instructor was very fluid in his delivery which makes it feel like he was extremely judicious with his time management.

    Posted by Gabriel Barbieri | July 13, 2012, 11:17 pm
  55. 1. The teacher would give the students 30 seconds and count the last 10 aloud. He also broke his directions into digestible chunks, and he articulated those directions very clearly which allowed the students to get to work without having to ask questions and wasting class time.

    2. The teacher did not give a great deal of praise to the students who were working diligently and quietly.

    3. I may have asked one of the students to repeat the directions to check for understanding, and I would have given more praise to the many students who were working according to expectations.

    Posted by Michael Hathaway | July 13, 2012, 11:26 pm
  56. 1. Which aspects of our checklist is the teacher using?
    The teacher clearly planned ahead of time. His language and tone was very clear which was key while giving explicit instructions. I also loved the use of countdown.

    2. Which aspects are absent in the video?
    I didn’t notice any CFU’s. Even though the instructions were clear as teachers we must remember that there is always going to be that one student who misunderstands you.

    3. Specifically identify 1-2 things you would do differently? Explain.
    Thanks to our wonderful Oprah style surprise I am pretty stoked about using my timer! There definitely were time limits in the video but I did not notice a visual timer. I personally appreciate when I can see the time that I have remaining to work on a particular task. Although this concept is new to me I would have made sure to check for understanding. Checking for understanding can be easily forgotten but it is also one of the most important aspects of teaching.

    Posted by Quincy Mitchell | July 13, 2012, 11:31 pm
  57. 1. Verbal timing was used regularly, It was clear that the exercise was pre-planned since the co-teacher knew how to support him and they didnt seem to be short on time. There was some direction chunking.
    2. I think there could have been a little more chunking of instruction. CFUs would have helped keep some students on task. More praise could have been given. Their was no progress tracking.
    3. I would have included much more praising and reinforcement in order to encourage better focus among the students. I also would have broken up my explanations with CFUs to chunk my directions and make sure all students understood their objectives.

    Posted by Christian Elysse Holmes | July 13, 2012, 11:43 pm
  58. He used verbal countdowns and lots of clear and concise directions. He also asked follow up questions after he gave directions to make sure they were heard. I noticed his use of time constraints and ge stated what materials the students needed to have out so the expectation was clear. I think one thing that was is positive reinforcement during the instructions. I would try to incorprate this as well as section off the directions a little more so things were chunked differently. I enjoyed the example!!

    Posted by Amy Cavanaugh | July 13, 2012, 11:45 pm
  59. The teacher planed his activity in the class and was creative. he also did verbal countdowns and gave the students out time.

    The students did not have a visual indicator of how much time was left.
    He did not check if the students had fully understood the topic, and he did not praise the students on their work.

    If this would have been my class room I would have used a bit more body language and would of walked around the classroom and praise the students.

    Posted by Norma Quintero | July 13, 2012, 11:50 pm
  60. Some aspects I saw during this video that the teachers used were using countdown, waiting for 100% and positive re-enforcement to get the students to meet the expectations.
    I believe what’s absent from this video was a real timer! I received one today! Thank you! It would have been nice to see him use one throughout the video instead of just the countdown
    I would have provided a visual timer and I also would have switched between countdown and that visual timer. Another thing I would do was to get them to complete a challenge using a timer.

    Posted by Bridgette Anthony | July 13, 2012, 11:52 pm
  61. – This teacher uses many techniques during his lesson such as countdowns, very clear directives and expectations, and purposeful plans.

    – To me, the lesson lacked CFU’s as a form to track current progress. However, I do think because the teacher was able to set a comfortable and positive atmosphere, as well as having the assistance from the team teacher, the students were open to asking questions if needed.

    – I would try to add more group CFU’s.

    I really enjoyed his lesson and how he incorporated the fact that it was a privilege to be working on a group project. Although many people above mentioned the use of a visual timer, I think the timing of this was fine. As Michael mentioned during our session, sometimes “teacher time” is an effective way to quickly adapt to many students who may still be working. Also, the timespans were short enough, that setting a timer during each countdown may become actually wasted instruction. The teacher seemed very well-prepared and confident during his lesson, and I also thought him and his team-teacher seemed very coordinated.

    Posted by Emily Tapp | July 14, 2012, 12:45 am
  62. I think the teacher had a good use of time to give students the sense of urgency.I actually did not hear a lot of reinforcements, but the students may be very used to the proocedures. One thing I would do differently is give more chunks of informationa dn take more pauses versus kind of continuing to move on. Overakkm it was very good.

    Posted by Chaz Culbertson | July 14, 2012, 2:10 am
  63. 1. Which aspects of our checklist is the teacher using?
    This teacher did a great job giving specific directions to his students. He laid out the expectations and held them to that. He also used a verbal countdown to communicate the wrapping up of time for the students. The students did not have to ask any questions which means they understood what they were supposed to be doing.

    2. Which aspects are absent in the video?
    The students were guessing how much time they had left to finish the assignment so for that activity it would have been more effective for them to have a timer that they could see or even just hear. Also, he could have let them know at 15 seconds so that they got a fair warning.

    3. Specifically identify 1-2 things you would do differently? Explain.
    I think his team teacher did a good job of taking the role of walking around the classroom. He could have used peer review at the end so that the students could check with each other to see what the right answer was. That way if one table of kids all had different answers then the teacher would know that he probably needed to spend more time clarifying the problem.

    Posted by Lissa Storey | July 14, 2012, 6:30 am
  64. 1. Which aspects of our checklist is the teacher using?
    The teacher was specific about the directions given to his students. He used verbal countdowns, was clear about exactly what he wanted, and then checked for understanding.

    2. Which aspects are absent in the video?
    A visual timer was not provided which would have really helped promote the sense of ergency among students.

    3. Specifically identify 1-2 things you would do differently? Explain.
    If it were my classroom, I would probably take more time to give more positive reinforcement to the group and to individuals. I would also walk around the classroom more to see if students had quetsions or redirect them if need be.

    Posted by Alicia Rodriguez | July 14, 2012, 7:09 am
  65. The teachers were clear and sure with regards to the execution of the lesson, which seemed well planned/thought though and thus potentially walked through. I liked his use of a verbal timer, although the use of a visual timer would have added to the efficiency to the class work they were carrying out. There was some chucking of directions and his directions was generally clear and specific, but he could have leveraged on the way his directions were broken down to insert moments where he checked for understanding. I especially wished that he had taken more time to redirect students who were not entirely focused. There were good moments where he waited for more eyes on him, but he did not redirect as much during the lesson itself. I liked how he said things like ‘I know you can do this’ and ‘you guys are a team’; however, he could have added to that by praising the students more frequently during the lesson – both as a source of encouragement and a way to reinforce the behavior he wanted to see in class.

    Posted by Sarah Thang | July 14, 2012, 7:11 am
  66. 1. Which aspects of our checklist is the teacher using?
    First of all, shout out to South East! The teacher(s) had obviously rehearsed and were well familiar with the content and the procedures. They seemed comfortable with the timing of things and weren’t reading from a script. At times, they did a good job of using verbal timing measures (counting down) to indicate their expectations to students. Most of the directions were fairly specific, and for the most part I think students were clear on what was expected of them throughout the lesson. When the female teacher stepped in towards the end of the video, I noticed that she positively narrated the actions of a few students as they recorded their guesses for how many kitkats could fit in the box. Finally, the male teacher redirected the whole class a few times and pointed out specific tables where students’ eyes were not where they needed to be.

    2. Which aspects are absent in the video?
    I didn’t see any visual timing devices used. Also, at the end of the grading exercise, I felt like the students needed to be given an allotted amount of time to record their grades before moving on to the next set of directions. If I were a student in the class, I would have felt flustered trying to get my stuff out and get that done while trying to listen to what was coming up next. This relates closely to chunking. While, for the most part, the teacher did a good job of chunking the activities, there were a few times when I would have broken up the directions a little more (minutes 2-5). I also would have liked to see a little more praise given, narrating specifically when students are doing well at following procedures and accompishing the objective.

    3. Specifically indentify 1-2 thins you would do differently.
    In terms of chunking the directions more, I would have engaged the students with things like checking for understanding, cold calling a student to repeat directions, having students explain the expectations to their partners, having students reflect on activities, etc. And like I said earlier, I would have designated a specific amount of time for students to record their grades, given them that time, got their attention, and then moved on.

    Posted by Brad Gillespie | July 14, 2012, 7:18 am
  67. This teacher clearly planned ahead of time and is confident in the subject he is teaching. He spoke slowly and clearly throughout the lesson. He did a great job at pacing the lesson and I think that giving verbal countdowns during each break was a big factor in that. For the next time, he could work on using visual timers so that the students could gauge where they were in the process. If I were to do this lesson, I would give more praise to the students because they all looked very on task throughout the video. I’d also ask for answers from the students and check for understanding more often. He did an awesome job.

    Posted by Rebecca Aillet | July 14, 2012, 7:20 am
  68. 1) The teachers were clear in what they wanted the students to accomplish. The teacher also chuncked the information and used a verbal countdown to remind students of how much time was left.

    2) There was little praise for the students, there was also no use of a visual timer (although I am not sure how it would have benefitted the students in this instance since it was such short time periods) and no check for understanding with the students.

    3) Two things that I would have done differently is check for understanding with the students to ensure they know what they are doing that day and then also track the students progress.

    Posted by Justine Sanchez | July 14, 2012, 7:29 am
  69. The teacher chunked his instructions and he spoke in a calm, clear voice. His directions were clear and he used a verbal timer (counting down for them to complete his task)

    Throughout the video students were slightly off task and he didn’t redirect their attention back towards him. He also paced while he was giving directions where he should have stood still.

    If this were my classroom I would have asked the students to participate while finding answers for the do-first (you have the opportunity to offer encouragement and check for understanding) and I would use a visual timer for the longer tasks (more than 5-10 seconds– I know I would lose track easily!).

    Posted by Kelly Webeck | July 14, 2012, 7:34 am
  70. 1. i think that the lesson plan was very well planned.
    His directions were specific and clear.
    He used verbal time limits.
    2. He didn’t use verbal timers and at times it seemed too distracting.
    3. I would walk around the class more and give my students more positive feedback to motivate them more.

    Posted by Paloma Contreras | July 14, 2012, 7:34 am
  71. 1. It looks like he planned the activity really well. They used time limits throughout to create a sense of urgency.
    2. I didn’t see any CFUs/
    3. I would use my hands when counting down because I will have some English Language Learners in my classroom. He talked for long stretches, which might have lost some students’ attention. I would like to use an actual timer, and probably a visual for the students. Also, maybe he was pressed for time, but it would be nice to hear from the students either when going over the answers or asking them to remind him of the expectations.

    Posted by Sarah Cooper | July 14, 2012, 7:45 am
  72. 1.) I think that his lesson plan was very well thought out and it definitely included his precise timing of the entire lesson. He gave the students a specific time frame by which to complete each task whether it be individual or group task.
    2.) He wasn’t clear how he was timing the students, which I think could have set higher expectations.
    3.) I would have paused after each chunked timing period to reinforce my expectations because at the end of each timing period he moved on without the class fully meeting them.

    Posted by Corinne Young | July 14, 2012, 7:48 am
  73. 1. The teacher appeared to have practice and preplanned his lesson. Huzzah for that! He did a great job chunking the information he was throwing at the students. He had the students attention. The countdowns were successful at urging the students to move. 2. The use of visible timers may have helped the students see the amount of time they had remaining.
    3. One thing I would have done differently, but may not be that important, would be to have the students pick up whatever worksheet that was passed out while he was explaining on the way into class. I would have a hard time listening if I didn’t have the notes yet and there was someone walking around.

    Posted by Tyne Varela | July 14, 2012, 7:48 am
  74. The lesson was well planned and the teachers did a good job at highlighting the directions. The directions were broken down pretty well to where the students could process them easily. He spoke clearly and did not go too fast while he was giving the directions.

    A timer would have help in some of the situations. Having a students hold it and give time updates sometimes would have been a way to include students while promoting urgency. There were times where I think more reinforcement could have been given to individual students who seemed to get off task.

    I would have made sure to check for understanding during the grading process to make sure everyone was on the same page. I would have also tried to get the students a little more involved by asking questions instead of talking for long periods of time.

    Posted by Chase Ice | July 14, 2012, 7:49 am
  75. 1. The activity was clearly well pre-planned, he used verbal timing, and taught explicitly by chunking directions and giving set amounts of time to complete them.
    2. I didn’t hear much praise coming from him or tracking of progress.
    3. I would have used a visual timer for the longer amounts of time so the students would know where they’re at in their time, and because it seemed distracting and possibly stressful to try to be coming up with an answer while someone is loudly counting down. I also would have acknowledged the first few students/groups who had completed the given task in order to encourage them and push the others to try harder.

    Posted by Emily Gillham | July 14, 2012, 7:52 am
  76. 1. The teacher was very specific with the instructions and set high expectations for the students. He used timed periods for each of the expectations and used countdowns for the students to complete the work efficiently.
    2. He didn’t ever use an actual timing device. I would always love to see more praise!
    3. I would have used some sort of a visual timer. I would also have had a procedure for getting papers passed out quick and effieciently so they weren’t wasting as much time passing out the paper initially.

    Posted by Kelsey Earnest | July 14, 2012, 7:58 am
  77. 1. He was clear with his directions and expectations. There was no timer used but he did count down. He used silence to get the students attention.
    2. No timer was used and he didn’t really walk around to help students (when he gave them 30 seconds to complete a task).
    3. There was a lot of directions given so I would have stopped in between a couple and CFU from some students to make sure they understoof.
    I would also praise the students more.

    Posted by Vu | July 14, 2012, 8:08 am
  78. 1. The activitity the teacher used was very well planned and it had a direct point. The directions had a clear and useful time for everyone to use. the students followed the directions very well.

    2. The tracking device that was use was not very clear and I could not see a use for it.

    3. I would have used the checked for understaning differently and used different proccedures for the students to follow.

    Posted by Jose Govea | July 14, 2012, 8:42 am
  79. 1. He chunked directions, used countdowns and made the consequences clear (if we don’t do this well, we won’t do this hands-on kind of activity again)

    2. No visual timer, though I’m not sure it was necessary as long as he was counting down.

    3. Done a CFU to be sure instructions/expectations were clear

    Posted by Shannon Wright | July 14, 2012, 1:15 pm
  80. 1. The teachers both used verbal timing devices, chunked directions, and clearly stated high expectations.

    2. There wasn’t ever an actual timing device use nor was it visually displayed where the students could see it.

    3. I would have used a visual device for timing. I feel like had that been present, he would have had a chance to walk around and talk to the students more as they came up with their estimates. I also would have praised the students a bit more!

    Posted by Janette Martinez | July 15, 2012, 5:24 pm
  81. 1. Which aspects of our checklist is the teacher using?
    Throughout the lesson both teachers use verbal timing to let the students know how long they had left. The male teacher made it easy for his students to remember because of the clunking technique.
    2. Which aspects are absent in the video?
    The instructor did not use a visual timer for longer periods of time.
    3. Specifically identify 1-2 things you would do differently? Explain.
    I would have used CFU’s to make sure students felt comfortable about the activity.

    Posted by Nico Cromwell | July 15, 2012, 7:25 pm
  82. It is evident that the teacher’s expectations are stated and they are high. I like that he used the Kit Kat bars as a good visual and that he let them know he had made the box and how long it took him. I think that lets his students know that he is invested in the activity and wants to do fun stuff with them. I didn’t like that he told the kids that doing things like that depended on their behavior. While it is not known if the students have misbehaved in the past, every new experience should be seen as a new opportunity. Also, I would have used a projected timer instead of the verbal countdown for the longer time periods. I do think he chunked the direction perfectly, allowing the students to gather the info and act appropriately. The lesson seemed engaging therefore motivating the students to want to know how many bars exactly would fit in the box. While some minor praising occurred a little more wouldn’t hurt for those tables who completed the taskquicker than others. Lastly, I think I personally would get a little more excited because he seemed a little less “on”, but perohaps he changed as the lesson progressed. He made me want to know the # of bars that would fit!

    Posted by Claudia E. Guerra | July 15, 2012, 8:27 pm
  83. 1. The teacher really planned the lesson out well, and the teacher effectivley used a verbal countdown. The teacher also did a great job of giving the students instructions.

    2. The teacher gave the students 30 seconds, but he did not use a timing device to track that time. I probably would have not used a timing device in that instance. I would use a actualy device such as a timer when over 1 minute.

    3. I actually think he should have given a little more time which would have enabled him to walk around more.

    Posted by Harley Garrett | July 15, 2012, 9:11 pm
  84. 1)The teacher used a verbal timer, chunked his directions, used positive narration and reinforcement.
    2)Although he used a timer early in the video, he could have done a better job with his timing later on. He did not use any sort of visual timer, which may have been more helpful to the students.
    3) There were a few times throughout the video where he could have been much more assertive while giving his instructions. Whether it was due to the video or just him, there was at least one time while giving instructions to the students that I could barely hear him. I also think he could have walked around the classroom a bit more, rather than just confining himself to the front.

    Posted by Jason Atnip | July 16, 2012, 12:45 am
  85. The overall structure of the lesson was pretty solid. Instructions were clearly presented, and chunked. At different points in the lesson, the teacher checked to make sure that 100% of the class was following the instructions, so he maintain high expectations.

    One thing that stuck out to me during this video is that there weren’t any CFU’s. So, if a student didn’t understand, or was not paying attention to the instructions, then they were going to be behind in the activity. Also, eventhough he had a team teacher, I would have liked to see him move around the room more.

    Posted by Creston Herron | July 16, 2012, 7:14 am
  86. 1) Uses verbal timer well, clear chunking of directions, and very clearly preplanned his instruction. He also several good attention-grabbing techniques.
    2) Does not use visual timer.
    3) One thing I would maybe have changed is given the students more time to transition from recording their scores to giving their attention to the teacher as he explains the kit kat activity. It just seems like the students are doing too much at once.

    Posted by Luis | July 16, 2012, 7:15 am

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