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Dear IC

Dear IC…Proactively Addressing Students’ Behavior

Dear IC,
As you know, I have been teaching for quite some time now… Well, a few months, but that’s pretty much forever. Nonetheless, I have had countless opportunities to observe my students and have become pretty good at reading their “moods.” I have this one student who, upon entering my class, I just know is going to have a “rough day” behaviorally. I really don’t know how to prevent it from escalating. In fact, I think I often feed into the problem because I am so aware of the inevitable behaviors. What should I do?

Sincerely,

Hada Badae

————————

Hi Hada,

Ahhhhh… I know exactly what you are talking about. Just like Spider Man can feel his “Spidey sense” tingling, teachers develop a sixth sense of the “mood shifts” they are about to endure within a class from particular students. The only difference between teachers and Spider Man is that Spider Man has entire cities to move about in his “fight” against the undesirable behaviors of villains, you have 140 square feet and four walls (leaving almost no place to hide). J So, how can we increase the number of “good days” and deter the “bad days?” The following are some strategies that will help you proactively address these students and their behavior before it becomes disruptive to either the classroom or their learning:


http://www.electricferret.com/forum

P.S. These are not class-wide behavior incentive systems (e.g. bonus points, ticket systems, accomplishment sheets, behavior sheets/poles, ladder to success, etc.)

Elementary

Middle School

High School

  • Personally greet them at the door and use their name (Research shows that our name is one of the most comforting things a person can hear)
  • Purposely give them positive encouragement or feedback
    publicly (“Wow! ____________ has an excellent question/response/strategy!” or “I really like how ___________ is ready to ____________ today.”
  • Give the student responsibility upon arrival (e.g. “I really need some responsible to <insert student task here> today, do you think you could help me out with that?”
  • Give the student choices to build investment (“Do you think Mr./Ms. <insert last name here> should write in Blue or Red today?”)
  • Write them a Mr./Ms. <insert your last name here> Gram on a post-it note (e.g. “You’re such an all-star reader. At this rate, you will be reading at a <insert next grade-level here> level in no time!”)
  • Get to know more about their personal interests (Interweave them into your examples in class or ask them about them before/after class)
  • Talk to your on-campus counselor/veteran teachers about other strategies
  1. Personally greet them at the door and use their name (Research shows that our name is one of the most comforting things a person can hear)
  2. Acknowledge their demeanor (“Good Morning, Student. You appear a little ____________ today, is everything alright?”)
  3. Purposely give them positive encouragement or feedback
    publicly (“Wow! ____________ has an excellent question/response/strategy!” or “I really like how ___________ is ready to ____________ today.”
  4. Give the student responsibility upon arrival (e.g. “Would you be willing to <insert student task here> today? Thanks, that helps so much!”)
  5. Give the student choices to build investment (“Later on we are going to be working with partners, do you think you would work best with <insert strategic student name here> or <insert strategic student name here>?”)
  6. Write them a personal note during class on a post-it note (e.g. “Your Do-First/Do-Now response is excellent, I can’t wait to see your responses to what we’re working on later in the class. Keep up the great work!”)
  7. Get to know more about their personal interests (Interweave them into your examples in class or ask them about them before/after class)
  8. Talk to your on-campus counselor/veteran teachers about other strategies
  1. Personally greet them at the door and use their name (Research shows that our name is one of the most comforting things a person can hear)
  2. Acknowledge their demeanor (“Good Morning, Student. You appear a little ____________ today, is everything alright?”)
  3. Give the student responsibility upon arrival (e.g. “Would you be willing to <insert student task here> today? Thanks, that helps so much!”)
  4. Give the student choices to build investment (“Later on we are going to be working with partners, do you think you would work best with <insert strategic student name here> or <insert strategic student name here>?”)
  5. Write them a personal note during class on a post-it note (e.g. “Your Do-First/Do-Now response is excellent, I can’t wait to see your responses to what we’re working on later in the class. Keep up the great work!”)
  6. Get to know more about their personal interests (Interweave them into your examples in class or ask them about them before/after class)
  7. Talk to your on-campus counselor/veteran teachers about other strategies

In case you have a spare hour or two in your schedule, which I’m sure you do, feel free to read this article written by the Center for Effective Collaboration and Practice. This article includes some excellent strategies for enhancing your “teacher sense” when working with students with emotional and behavioral problems.

Sincerely,

IC Calvin


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